Category: Program

Session Moderators

Session Moderator Instructions & Conference Duties

General Information

  • All sessions will have two Session Moderators.
  • On average, sessions will have about 8 presentations.
  • There are three types of sessions. They are: plenary sessions, regular oral sessions, and poster sessions.
  • Session Moderators are not required to submit reviewer nominations for manuscript submissions/peer review, however, you are welcome to make suggestions of reviewers if you are inclined to be of help to the Technical Editors.
  • Session Moderators must complete the Session Moderator Report and return it to the Speaker Preparation/Ready Room.
  • If a scheduled presentation has no-show presenters and the presentation has to be canceled (e.g. was not given), the corresponding manuscript, if submitted, will not be considered for peer review and published in the ASC 2024 special edition of the IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity (TAS). The authors will be referred to submit to the regular issue of the TAS.
  • NEW THIS YEAR: ELEVATE is introducing a new program to allow students to apply to shadow an oral session moderator. The graduate students in this program have familiarity with oral session moderating but would like to observe some of the techniques an experienced moderator might use to keep a session on time or manage Q&A after a talk. We are hoping that the confirmed moderators of sessions in which a student has been assigned agree to work with the student, arriving a few minutes early to discuss the session expectations, and potentially giving the student some responsibility during the session. We are expecting 40 students to be assigned to sessions related to their interests, if the session you are assigned to moderate has been assigned a student, you will be informed beforehand (no later than 2 weeks before the start of the conference) and rewarded with a small token of our appreciation for your efforts.

The instructions below outline your responsibilities in regard to managing the session.

Session Moderators for ORAL SESSIONS have several responsibilities.

Prior to the session start:

  • Please go to the Speaker Preparation/Ready Room prior to the session to check whether all presentations have been submitted.
  • Please go to the Speaker Preparation/Ready Room to pick up your Session Moderator Report(s) that you are asked to complete after your session and return to the Speaker Preparation Room.
  • Take 5 – 10 minutes prior to the session to familiarize yourself with lighting controls, computer, laser pointer, slide controls, microphones, and the general layout of the room (viewing angles, doors, noise, etc.).
  • If there are any issues, please advise the conference staff.
  • Take a roll-call of all speakers.
  • PowerPoint tip: F5 will start the presentation, ESC exits.
  • Acrobat tip: Ctrl – L will enter full-screen mode, ESC exits.

Beginning of and during sessions:

  • Announce the title of the session.
  • Introduce yourselves and explain the ground rules:
    • Invited oral = 25 min (warn at 23) + 5 min for questions. Contributed oral = 12 min (warn at 10) + 3 min for questions.
  • You should introduce the presenting author and the title of each presentation.
  • Be polite but firm when enforcing these guidelines: Stand, ask the speaker to conclude. Keep control of the session time!
  • At your discretion, talks may encroach into question time, but then you should defer questions to private discussion.
  • Ask your own questions to encourage participation in Q&A from all speakers
  • Every presentation must be exactly as scheduled. If a speaker does not show on time for his/her presentation, the next speaker shall not begin the presentation until the scheduled time. Moderators may fill the time before the next presentation starts by allowing more questions or initiating discussion on the subject of the session.
  • Make sure the to end the session on time.
  • Monitor noise, audience, etc.
  • The two chairs can alternate this task.
  • Complete and return the Session Moderator Report to the Speaker Preparation/Ready Room. Check off presentations as they are given. Also estimate the audience size. This information must be returned to the Speaker Preparation/Ready Room.
  • PLEASE! Do not let anyone walk away with the laser pointer!

POSTER SESSIONS do not require introduction of the authors or of the presentations.

  • Please go to the  Speaker Preparation/Ready Room to pick up your Session Moderator Report(s) and return the completed report to the Speaker Preparation/Ready Room after your session.
  • Session Moderators are asked to record any posters that were not presented. One of the authors must be present at most, if not all, times with the poster presentation.
  • Important: Walk the session multiple times. Note that in some cases, an author may need to attend to more than one poster, and thus might not be present during your first survey, so you may have to return later. Poster presenters will be instructed by Conference Management to leave a note on their posters to say when they will return. Feel free to remind the attendees of this request.
  • Posters that have been mounted but do not have an attendant, or posters that are missing entirely, must be recorded on the Session Moderator Report.

Session Moderator Reports – Drop Off

Session Moderator reports are due to the Speaker Preparation/Ready Room immediately following your session (preferably) or at the end of the day of your assigned session(s).

Plenary Speakers

Program Plenary Speakers

The ASC 2024 Conference continues our long-standing tradition of creating an exciting program including a slate of vibrant plenary speakers who will discuss important topical research in a form accessible to all attendees.

Darby Dunn

Darby Dunn
Vice President of Production, Commonwealth Fusion Systems
Presenting on: Monday, September 2, 2024 | 8:15 a.m.

Darby Dunn is the Vice President of Production at Commonwealth Fusion Systems, a clean energy startup based in Devens, MA, where she is responsible for the company’s day-to-day operations including manufacturing and facilities. Supported by the world’s leading investors and a collaborative partnership with MIT’s Plasma Science and Fusion Center, the CFS team is driven by the climate change crisis to develop the fastest path to commercial fusion energy. In her previous role as Head of Manufacturing, Darby led the production of the world’s largest high-temperature superconducting magnet which successfully demonstrated the key technology needed to enable net-positive fusion energy. Before joining the CFS team in early 2019, Darby spent a decade at SpaceX developing and manufacturing the Dragon spacecraft to deliver cargo and astronauts to the International Space Station. Darby also co-founded the LGBTQ employee interest groups at both SpaceX & CFS and she is actively involved in STEM outreach events, including sitting on the Board of Directors for Out For Undergrad. She was also named to Business Insider’s list of the Most Powerful Female Engineers of 2017 and to the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders in 2018. Darby received her B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Presentation title: Production of HTS Magnets from Lab Scale to Commercial Fusion Power Plants

Abstract: Coming Soon

Kazumasa Iida

Kazumasa Iida
Professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nihon University, Japan
Presenting on: Tuesday, September 3, 2024 | 8:00 a.m.

Dr. Kazumasa Iida is a full professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Nihon University. He spent the University of Cambridge from 2004 to 2007 as a postdoctoral researcher under the supervision of Prof. David A Cardwell. After spending 3.5 years in Cambridge, he joined the group led by Prof. Bernhard Holzapfel at the IFW Dresden as a senior scientist. He was appointed as an associate professor at Nagoya University in 2014 and as a full professor at Nihon University in 2022 His research experience covers a wide range of materials, involving the fabrication of Sr-ferrite magnets, the growth of garnet films for magneto-optical imaging, and the growth of HTS and Fe-based superconducting materials in the form of bulks and thin films. He has published more than 200 peer-review research papers. He is currently in the editorial board of Superconductivity.

Presentation title: Status of Iron Based Superconductors: Characteristics and Relevant Properties to Applications

Abstract: Click here.

Ezio Todesco

Ezio Todesco
Senior Scientist, CERN
Presenting on: Wednesday, September 4, 2024 | 8:00 a.m.

Dr. Ezio Todesco received his PhD in Physics at the University of Bologna, Italy, on the stability of classical mechanical systems and chaotic motion with application to beam dynamics in circular colliders. In the nineties he participated to the studies of nonlinear motion of protons in the foreseen Large Hadron Collider, and to their long-term stability in view of the magnetic field imperfections. He then joined the CERN magnet group to follow and guarantee the field quality in the production of the LHC main magnets. At the end of the LHC production, he oversaw the magnetic model of the collider during the commissioning phases and in the following runs. In 2007, he started working on the upgrade of the LHC luminosity, focusing on magnet design and on the optics of the interaction regions. Since 2011 he has been leading the worldwide collaboration building the interaction region magnets in the HL-LHC project, with the first Nb3Sn magnets to be installed in a collider in 2026-2028. In 2024, he became the lead for the High Field Magnet program at CERN, in collaboration with numerous institutes and laboratories. He has been teaching superconducting magnet for particle accelerators at the U.S. Particle Accelerator School, at CERN Accelerator School, and at the University of Milano Bicocca. He has been a member of the ASC board since 2020, and he is the author of over 300 publications and contributor to several books.

Presentation title: Status and Perspectives in High Field Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

Abstract: Click here.

Ken Segall

Ken Segall
Professor of Physics, Colgate University
Presenting on: Thursday, September 5, 2024 | 8:15 a.m.
 

Dr. Ken Segall has been working in superconducting electronics since 1995. His areas of research include superconducting detectors, nonlinear dynamics in superconducting circuits, superconducting quantum computing, quantum tunneling in Josephson arrays, synchronization in superconducting networks, numerical simulation of superconducting circuits, and superconducting artificial neurons and synapses. Dr. Segall received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1999 in the department of Applied Physics where he was the winner of the Harding Bliss Award for Excellence in Applied Physics and Engineering. After some postdoctoral work at Yale, he was a postdoctoral associate at M.I.T. in the Electrical Engineering Department for three years. In 2003 he started as an Assistant Professor at Colgate University in the Physics and Astronomy department, where he has been ever since. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 2009 and Full Professor in 2017. He served as department chair in 2013 and from 2014-2017. His teaching interests include Thermodynamics, Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos, Solid State Physics, Electricity and Magnetism, Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics, Math Methods of Physics, and Sports Statistics and Analytics. He lives in Central New York with his wife and two children.

Presentation title: Neuromorphic Computing Using Superconducting Electronics

Abstract: Click here.

Alex Gurevich

Alex Gurevich
Professor of Physics and Eminent Scholar, Old Dominion University
Presenting on: Friday, September 6, 2024 | 8:00 a.m. 

Professor Gurevich is a theoretical condensed matter physicist specializing in superconductivity and materials science of high-performance superconductors carrying high current densities at high dc magnetic fields or operating under large-amplitude radio-frequency electromagnetic fields. His recent works have addressed anomalously large upper critical fields in alloyed MgB2, microwave reduction of nonlinear surface resistance and new ways of boosting the microwave performance of superconducting resonators by surface nanostructuring. In 1989 he was awarded the Humboldt Fellowship to work on the high-Tc cuprares at the Institute of Technical Physics at KFK, Karlsruhe. From 1992 to 2006 he was a senior scientist in the Applied Superconductivity Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he worked on current-limiting mechanisms in superconducting materials. In 2006 he was a staff scientist at NHMFL, where he worked on properties of the newly discovered iron-based superconductors at high magnetic fields. In 2012 he joined the faculty of the Physics Department at Old Dominion University as a full professor. Gurevich is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He has published two books and more than 190 journal papers and has given 110 invited talks.

Presentation title: What Should We Look for in New Superconductors to Make Them Useful?

Abstract: Click here.

Oral Presentation Instructions

Guidelines and Instructions for Oral Presenters

All Plenary Sessions take place at the Hyatt Regency Hotel (connected to the Salt Palace Convention Center).
All Oral Sessions take place at the Salt Palace Convention Center.

Terms and Conditions:

  • Presenters agree to abide by policies for Abstract Changes, Corrections and Withdrawal, see below.
  • All presentations must be in English.
  • Abstracts accepted for presentation are made available publicly with launching the full conference program prior to the conference.
  • Presenters are required to submit an electronic version of their talk at least one day prior to their presentation to the Speaker Preparation/Ready Room (Room 150G) at the Salt Palace Convention Center. Files are reviewed, scanned for viruses and loaded onto the appropriate computers in the session rooms, see below for additional information. Personal laptops are not permitted for use.
  • Only material that corresponds to the listing in the published program may be submitted for presentation. Presentation management staff will be instructed to check for discrepancies.
  • Any author presenting at ASC 2024 must be a registered participant of the Conference and be present in Salt Lake City.
  • The registration fee includes one manuscript submission of an accepted abstract for presentation. Additional manuscript submissions may be purchased for an additional fee, see the Publication page for detailed information.
  • Using removable media (USB drives) is prohibited on the computers in oral session rooms. Saving data to and from them is not possible.
  • Files transferred to the session computers cannot be copied by anyone and will be deleted after the Conference. Anyone wishing to receive a copy of the slides should contact the presenter, not ASC.

Presentation Guidelines

  • Presentations must be submitted in Microsoft Power Point 2019 and 2021 / PowerPoint 365 or PDF format. Acceptable media: USB flash drive. Macintosh computers will not be available in any of the session rooms. Authors using a Macintosh must ensure their presentations operate correctly using Microsoft Office 2018/2019/365 or Adobe Acrobat in the Windows environment.
  • Presentations should be prepared in 16:9 format.
  • All session rooms are equipped with a LCD projector, computer, microphones, laser pointer, timer and screen. The laptops in the oral session rooms are not equipped to accommodate audio sound.
  • Contributed presentations at 15 minutes: arrange your talk so that your presentation lasts 12 – 13 minutes with 2 – 3 minutes available for questions.
  • Invited presentations might have different durations depending on how the session is organized. Please check the final program as some sessions may have additional time constraints.
    • Invited presentations at 30 minutes: arrange your talk so that your presentation lasts 25 minutes with 5 minutes available for questions.
    • Invited presentation at 20 minutes: arrange your talk so that your presentation lasts 16-18 minutes with 2-4 minutes available for questions.
    • If your invited presentation is scheduled for 15 minutes, please follow the contributed oral presentation guidelines above.
  • Arrive a few minutes before the session and introduce yourself to the session moderators before the start of the session.
  • There will be no rearrangement of presentations within an oral session to accommodate absences or cancellations. The time assigned to an oral presentation within the oral session is fixed.

Abstract Changes, Corrections, and Withdrawal

  • Abstract content changes to your accepted entry in the program, i.e., modification of title or body, must be submitted to the conference management and approved by the Program Chairs before August 1, 2024. Please include your Abstract Control ID or Presentation ID in the subject line of your email.
  • After August 1, 2024 only requests to the presenting author will be considered.
  • Changes to the presenting author can only be requested by the abstract submitter (usually the corresponding author).
  • If you need to withdraw your abstract, please contact Centennial Conferences via e-mail. Please include the reason for withdrawing and provide your Abstract Control ID or Presentation ID in the e-mail subject line.

Manuscript Consideration

  • Authors are invited to submit a manuscript to the special conference issue of the IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity (TAS). 
  • Manuscript submission is not a requirement of making a presentation at the conference.
  • Presentation of your work in the published ASC 2024 program is required for a manuscript to be considered for peer review.
    • The presentation should be given at the appointed time in the program, by the appointed presenter.
    • Presentation does not guarantee a published manuscript.
  • Changes to the program, which have been approved by the ASC 2024 Program Chairs, will be allowed for submitted manuscripts.
  • Click here for manuscript preparation & submission details.

Content Organization

  • Plan one slide per minute: 8 to 12 slides for Contributed Oral, and up to 25 slides per Invited Oral.
  • Carefully budget your time. Allocate at least one minute to describe the problem clearly enough for the audience to appreciate the value of your contribution.
  • Make sure the audience walks away understanding the five things any listener to a presentation really cares about:
    • What is the problem and why?
    • What has been done about it?
    • What is the presenter doing (or has done) about it?
    • What additional value does the presenter’s approach provide?
    • Where do we go from here?

Fonts

  • Select a Sans-serif fonts: Arial or Helvetica. Avoid Serif fonts such as Times New Roman: the Serif fonts are more difficult to read.
  • Select font size to be visible over the whole room. We recommend font 24. Do not use fonts less than 18 points.
  • Consider font embedding to ensure that characters display properly.
  • Use larger fonts to indicate importance.
  • Use different sizes and styles (e.g., bold) for impact. Avoid italicized fonts as these are difficult to read quickly.
  • Avoid long sentences, Avoid abbreviations and acronyms. Limit punctuation marks.
  • No more than six lines per slide, and no more than 6-8 words per line.
  • Do not use all caps except for titles.

Design and Graphical Images

  • Include only necessary information: Content should be self-evident.
  • Keep the background consistent and subtle.
  • Use one or two large images rather than several small images.
  • Limit the tables to four rows/columns for readability.
  • Charts: The number of curves should be four or less. Label axes, curves and captions clearly using readable letters, font 18 or larger.
  • Limit the number of colors on a single screen.
  • Keep the design clean and uncluttered. Leave empty space around the text and graphical images.
  • Limit the number of graphical images on each slide.
  • Avoid sound effects.
  • Minimize animation.

Additional helpful tips can be found here.

Speaker Preparation/Ready Room

Presentation Upload Room 150G
Program Changes/Withdrawals Room 150G

Hours of Operation

Sunday, September 1, 2024 3:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Monday, September 2, 2024 7:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, September 3, 2024 7:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, September 4, 2024 7:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, September 5, 2024 7:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Friday, September 6, 2024 7:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Contact Information

For questions, changes, withdrawal requests, please contact Centennial Conferences via email at asc@centennialconferences.com. Please be sure to reference your Abstract ID in any correspondence.

Special & Memorial Sessions

Special Session Announcements

The ASC 2024 program committee is organizing a series of special sessions which will be of interest to various attendees, including engineers/scientists, system-level developers, and industry-level representatives. These sessions will feature both special invited presentations and contributed talks.

In addition, ASC 2024 will be holding memorial sessions to honor remarkable individuals who made significant contributions to the field of applied superconductivity but have since passed away.

Please refer to the list of special and memorial sessions below.

ASC 2024 Electronics Special Sessions

Superconducting Quantum Sensing for Axion Search

For over two decades, superconducting quantum sensors have been critical in enabling searches for axion dark matter. Axions are well-motivated Dark Matter candidates that would also solve the strong CP problem in QCD, but their allowed mass range covers more than 10 orders of magnitude, and the measurable signals induced by axions are very weak. It will be impossible to complete the search for QCD axion dark matter over their full mass range without the use of new quantum techniques utilizing superconducting sensors with sensitivity better than the standard quantum limit. Sensors developed for axion searches have synergies with astrophysical searches and advances in instrumentation including quantum-enabled readout, high-Q resonators and cavities, and large high-field magnets. This special session includes an overview talk by Prof. Kent Irwin illustrating both the necessity of quantum sensing in high energy physics and its feasibility, followed by four talks describing efforts in detail.

Organized by: Hsiao-Mei Sherry Cho (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

Superconducting Qubits: Connecting Device Performance to Material Properties and Nanostructure

With tremendous improvements in their performance over the past couple of decades, superconducting quantum devices have emerged as a leading technology platform for addressing complex computational problems that are intractable with their classical counterparts. Nonetheless, demonstrating scalable quantum systems requires significant improvements in the lifetime of quantum states, or coherence times of these devices. This lifetime limits the circuit depth achievable in quantum computing platforms while also limiting the achievable error rates (fidelity) associated with single and multi-qubit operation. The presence of defects, impurities, interfaces, and surfaces in the constituent materials represents a critical barrier limiting these coherence times, but often the exact mechanisms limiting performance remain not understood. As a result, groups around the world are collaborating across boundaries of different disciplines and communities, using a wide variety of characterization techniques to draw correlations between structural defects and chemical inhomogeneities to the performance of superconducting qubits. These include materials characterization techniques such as scanning/transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction/reflectivity, scanning probe microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and atom probe tomography performed at both room temperature and cryogenic temperatures and superconducting characterization techniques including THz spectroscopy, magneto optical imaging, point contact tunneling and muon spin rotation. Through these efforts, and in collaboration with computational material efforts, researchers have identified a wide variety of defective structures that may serve as possible sources of two-level systems (TLS) or non-TLS dissipation in superconducting qubit systems. This work is at the core of recent efforts such as those established by the DOE National Quantum Information Science Research Centers, in particular the Superconducting Quantum Materials and Systems Center (SQMS). A national nanofabrication taskforce has been established by SQMS with the participation of experts from research and industrial foundries across the nation working hand in hand with materials science experts to address performance understanding and systematicity and reproducibility. This session invites world leading experts from different collaborating communities reporting new methodologies and approaches to this problem and most recent results.

Organized by: Anna Grassellino (Fermilab)

TES Workshop: CMB-S4: Detectors / Readout / Modules

CMB-S4 (the Cosmic Microwave Background Experiment – Stage 4) is a next-generation ground-based experiment designed to precisely map the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with unprecedented sensitivity. The project is a joint pursuit by the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation and has been recommended as a high priority in the National Academies Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2020 (Astro2020) and as a top priority in the 2023 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) Report recommendations. The CMB-S4 project will deploy ~500,000 orthomode transducer (OMT)-coupled superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers across ~500 arrays, which will be addressed by multiplexed SQUID readout. Detector modules consisting of TES bolometer arrays, readout electronics, optical coupling wafers, feedhorn arrays, and accompanying electrical connections will be fielded to sites in both the Atacama Desert of Chile and the Antarctic plateau at the South Pole Station. This Special Session, held within the TES Workshop at ASC 2024, will highlight the technical progress of the CMB-S4 project in the areas of superconducting detectors, SQUID readout, and module design/assembly/testing.

Organized by: Shannon Duff (NIST), Douglas Bennett (NIST), Kaja Rotermund (LBNL), and Paul Szypryt (NIST/CU-Boulder)

For additional details regarding the Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) Workshop, click here.

ASC 2024 Materials Special Sessions

Get Together: Challenges and Opportunities of Superconducting Materials

The special session “Get together: challenges and opportunities of superconducting materials” aims to bring together the materials audience to discuss the present and future of the most relevant superconducting materials. Representative materials experts will discuss the challenges, opportunities and application niches of each type of material, namely new high temperature superconducting materials, Nb-based materials, REBCO coated conductors, BSCCO, MgB2 and Fe-based materials. The session will conclude with a round table discussion on common situations and needs for the superconducting community. We believe it is a good moment to bring the materials audience together to discuss common concerns to make superconducting materials a reality for our society.

Organized by: Teresa Puig (ICMAB, CSIC) and Yanwei Ma (IEE, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

ASC 2024 Large Scale Special Sessions

Fusion Public-private Partnership

We would like to invite you to join us for a special session on fusion public-private partnership, where experts from both academia and industry will convene to explore the intricate dynamics of fusion energy technology and its critical implications for our collective energy future within the public-private partnership approach.

This special session aims to achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand the nuances of public-private opportunities across diverse global landscapes;
  • Facilitate insightful discourse through a speaker series session, offering succinct presentations and guided discussions;
  • Address pertinent questions surrounding fusion energy technology development, public-private partnerships, geopolitical influences, workforce requirements, private startup impacts, and risk mitigation strategies in magnet technology development.

Your participation in this session will contribute significantly to the advancement of fusion energy discussion, shaping the trajectory of this vital field.

Organized by: Luigi Muzzi (ENEA), Erica Salazar (CFS), Nicolò Riva (Proxima Fusion), Robert Duckworth (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), and Valentina Corato (ENEA)

Superconductivity Global Alliance (ScGA) for a Greener, Healthier, more Prosperous and Sustainable Future

Superconducting technologies have been developed significantly over the last few decades and are ready to be scaled up and deployed in diverse applications beyond their present usage (MRI, NMR, and physical sciences and research). Superconductivity has the potential to provide means towards zero-emission targets, enabling extensive usage of wind power generation, facilitating zero-emission transportation, enabling fusion power, superconducting quantum computing, water purification new medical diagnosis and therapy tools, and new scientific breakthroughs.

To realize the potential of superconductors in addressing our societal future needs as identified in the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also called the Global Goals; will require, among other things, the development of new partnerships and alliances including new business models for investment and funding to accelerate the development of commercial superconducting technologies and solutions for diverse sectors and translate it into successful market applications.

This special session will review the progress of the Superconducting Global Alliance (ScGA) initiative for a Greener, Healthier, Prosperous, and Sustainable Future. Proposed strategic roadmaps and an update on Consortia membership addressing identified grand challenges will be presented for identified smart markets in healthcare, big science, digital and computing, industrial, and energy sectors followed by a panel discussion on the ScGA’s role in addressing the Global Development Goals.

Organized by: Ziad Melhem (Oxford Quantum Solutions Ltd.) and Joseph Minervini (Novum Industria LLC)

ASC 2024 Joint Special Sessions

Are NI REBCO Magnets Really Self-protected?

Non-insulated (NI) wound magnet technology using REBCO coated conductors are of interest for use in a variety of magnet applications, from high-field research magnets to fusion applications. The primary interest in this technology is based on the premise that they provide passive protection against a destructive quench event and local defects. While this has proven true for some NI coils which demonstrated robust quench protection, other NI coils have experienced significant thermal damage during quench indicating the allowable design and operational space for successful passive protection for NI coils is not yet well understood. To fulfill this knowledge gap in the community, a special session has been organized that will include an overview of NI coil technology along with talks presenting the experiences and failure analysis of NI/MI coils from groups working on various magnet applications. A 30-minute panel discussion between the presenters and the audience will follow.

Organized by: Satoshi Awaji (Tohoku University, Institute for Materials Research) and Ashleigh Francis (Commonwealth Fusion Systems)

Facilitating Superconductivity Commerce with Standards

This session takes a bold look at how an essential component of future commercial sectors might evolve from the present marketplace. Superconducting standards have underpinned many aspects of the supply chain feeding medical imaging magnets and major acquisitions for large science facilities, sectors that have valuations in the billions of dollars. Yet, despite the maturity of conventional superconductors, much is needed to be done for emerging sectors in quantum information, sustainable energy, and next-generation medical and science magnets. Speakers will describe the pervasive use of standards in present commerce as well as critical areas for development including new definitions and terminology, property measurements, calibrations and references, and workforce.

Organized by: Michael Parizh (GE HealthCare) and Lance Cooley (NHMFL/Florida State University)

Mechanical Limits of REBCO in Applications

In application, REBCO tapes and components often operate at their limits, which can lead to the degrading of the device if the stresses exceed the limit. Every specific application stresses the tapes in a specific way, therefore many aspects must be considered, and wide range of experimental conditions should be applied in order to investigate the mechanical limits of REBCO tapes.

The objective of this session is to give a brief overview of the questions that need to be addressed for common applications, like fusion magnets, high-field magnets, cables, and joints. Depending on the operational conditions, the REBCO based superconducting device is subjected to various loads – cycling or stationary, longitudinal, or transversal to the tape direction, compressive or tensile, or combinations of them. Some of these loads are due to impregnating REBCO tapes with structural materials, such as solders or resins. The mechanical limits of REBCO tapes vary depending on the tape supplier. Experiments on mechanical limits are often performed for REBCO tapes as they are received, or on specific REBCO-based components or devices. The evolution of the critical current at 77K is a common approach to identify the irreversibility limit of the strain and the possible degradation due to mechanical loads. Modelling is often used for results verification and understanding the origin of degradation of REBCO tapes due to mechanical loads.

The most important aspects of mechanical limits of REBCO tapes for applications are addressed in session presentations.

Organized by: Nadezda Bagrets (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) and Valentina Corato (ENEA)

ASC 2024 Memorial Sessions

Remembering Harold Weinstock: A Tribute to His Dedicated Support of High Transition Temperature Superconductor Josephson Junctions 

This session memorializes Dr. Harold Weinstock, a former program officer at the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, where he managed programs in electronics and electronic materials that relate to superconductivity. The speakers in this session span the three areas of ASC, e.g., electronics, materials and large scale and will present highlights of some of the work that he supported over his career.  Harold received a B.A. in physics from Temple University in 1956 and a Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University in 1962. In 1999, he was awarded an honorary doctorate from INSA de Lyon. He was for more than 20 years a professor of physics at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). He was the founding director of IIT’s Educational Technology Center. Dr. Weinstock was a Fellow of the Air Force Research Laboratory, the American Physical Society, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.  He served as ASC Board Chair (1998-2000) and directed the ASC in September 2000 at Virginia Beach, VA. Dr. Weinstock carried out research for much of his career. Among his accomplishments, he was a leading expert in the science and engineering of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In addition to IIT, he served in research appointments at the University of Maryland, the Naval Research Laboratory, the University of Leuven in Belgium, the University of Nijmegen in The Netherlands, INSA de Lyon in France, and the University of Houston. In 2002, he was a Guest Professor at the University of Paris VI, Pierre et Marie Curie, where he helped establish a research program in SQUID nondestructive evaluation. From 1972 to 1986, he was a part-time Visiting Staff Member at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he engaged in research on current-carrying superconductors. He was the author or co-author of over 100 articles on scientific research or educational development, held one patent, and edited 11 books, mostly on superconductivity.

Harold’s unwavering support, insight and dedication catalyzed groundbreaking research in superconductivity. Though he may have departed, his legacy of innovation and inspiration will continue through the students he educated, books that he published and researchers who he supported. Rest in peace, knowing your contributions have forever altered the course of scientific discovery.

Organized by: Shane Cybart (University of California Riverside)

Sae Woo Nam Memorial Session: Superconducting Single-Photon Detectors

This session is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Sae Woo Nam (1970-2024). Sae Woo made significant contributions to the development of superconducting single-photon detectors, including both transition edge sensors (TESs) and superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). Not only did he demonstrate high system detection efficiency devices, but he also demonstrated some of the key technological developments, such as self-aligned optical fibers, amorphous alloys, and the use of compact cryocoolers, that enabled the commercialization of these devices in the past decade.

Sae Woo completed his PhD in 1999 at Stanford under the supervision of Prof. Blas Cabrera, where he demonstrated the first TES measurements of infrared photons and investigated TESs for dark matter detection. He joined NIST as an NRC postdoctoral fellow in 1999 under the supervision of Dr. John Martinis. He refined the optical TES and demonstrated the photon-number resolving capabilities of this device. It was then used in a portable system at Boston University to make the first measurements of Hong-Ou-Mandel photon bunching in collaboration with Prof. Sergienko’s quantum optics group. In 2008, he demonstrated 98% system detection efficiency (SDE) in TESs, a record result that enabled loophole-free Bell experiments and advances in photonic quantum computing.

 Sae Woo also did pioneering work with SNSPDs. In 2007, Sae Woo and collaborators demonstrated a QKD system that held the distance record in optical fiber for a decade. Sae Woo pioneered the use of WSi to make SNSPDs in 2010, and he demonstrated 93% SDE in these devices in 2013. In 2015, his group used SNSPDs to demonstrate a loophole-free Bell experiment at the same time as Prof. Zeilinger’s group used Sae Woo’s TESs to perform a similar experiment in Vienna. In recognition of this work, Sae Woo was a co-recipient of the 2017 John Stewart Bell Prize for Research on Fundamental Issues in Quantum Mechanics and their Applications.

Besides the Bell Prize, Sae Woo was awarded numerous other prizes during his 25-year career. He was a Fellow of Optica, IEEE, and APS. He received the Jacob Rabinow Applied Research Award from NIST in 2008 and the Arthur Flemming Award. He was named a NIST Fellow in 2013 and received the Presidential Rank Award in 2017 for his contributions to quantum information science.  Sae Woo also served as a vocal evangelist for single-photon technologies throughout the U.S. government and was instrumental in supporting a number of major efforts to advance these methods.

Sae Woo is remembered by his friends and colleagues as not only a brilliant scientist but as a humble man. He always wanted to include his colleagues in all his awards. He will be remembered as much for his love of friends and family as for his scientific accomplishments.

Organized by: Karl Berggren (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Richard Mirin (National Institute of Standards and Technology)

Theodore Van Duzer Memorial Session: Digital – Memory

Organized by: Nobuyuki Yoshikawa (Yokohama National University) and Oleg Mukhanov (SEEQC)

William Sampson Memorial Session: Accelerator Magnets from the Beginning

William (Bill) Sampson of Brookhaven National Laboratory, passed away on October 17, 2023. Bill was an early pioneer in the development of superconducting accelerator magnets. This Special Session highlights Bill’s many accomplishments and contributions throughout his productive and long career.

Organized by: Kathleen Amm (Brookhaven National Laboratory) and Steve Gourlay (FNAL)

Poster Presentation Instructions

Guidelines and Instructions for Poster Presenters

All poster sessions will take place in the Exhibit Hall BCD of the Salt Palace Convention Center.

Terms and Conditions:

  • Presenters agree to abide by policies for Abstract Changes, Corrections and Withdrawal, see below.
  • All presentations must be in English.
  • Abstracts accepted for presentation are made available publicly with launching the full conference program prior to the conference.
  • Any author presenting at ASC 2024 must be a registered participant of the Conference and be present in Salt Lake City.
  • Poster presenters must be available to discuss the work and answer questions at the appointed time in the program.
  • The registration fee includes one manuscript submission of an accepted abstract for presentation. Additional manuscript submissions may be purchased for an additional fee, see the Publication page for detailed information.
  • Posting of the pages of the manuscript does not constitute presentation. Such poster presentations will be considered no-show.

Presentation Guidelines

  • Your poster must correspond to the title and content of the abstract you submitted.
  • Please display your assigned presentation ID prominently in the title area of the poster.
  • Each presentation is assigned to one side of the board, whether invited or not.
  • It is NOT acceptable to merely post a copy of your paper. Such presentations will be marked as a “no-show” presentation.
  • Poster presenters are expected to arrange their material on poster boards before the session starts, see setup and dismantle times further below.
  • Presenters may bring pre-prints or handouts and make them available on the poster board.
  • There are no parallel oral sessions during the poster sessions.
  • Authors will be permitted to view other posters in the nearby area where posters of similar topic are clustered. Please keep in mind that authors are expected to be available for attendees.
  • If you have more than one poster and they are not side by side, then you need to spread your time over all poster presentations. Please place a note on the poster board of your other location(s) and the time you expect to be present. Please also inform the session chair(s).

Poster Board Information

  • Each horizontal poster board measures 4 ft (48 inches, 121 cm) (height, top to bottom) x 8 ft (96 inches, 243 cm) (width, right to left), and has two sides (front and back).
  • Each presentation is assigned to one side of the board, whether invited or not.
  • Your poster must be designed to fit within the confines of a 3.6 ft (43 inches, 110 cm) high x 7.6 ft (91 inches, 232 cm) wide poster board and consist of materials that can be mounted easily with push pins.

Poster Setup and Dismantle Times

Day Setup Session Tear Down
Monday, September 2 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. 2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. 6:15 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, September 3 7:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
10:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
2:15 p.m.  – 4:15 p.m.
12:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
4:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, September 4 7:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
10:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
12:45 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
4:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Thursday, September 5 7:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. 10:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. 12:45 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Abstract Changes, Corrections, and Withdrawal

  • Abstract content changes to your accepted entry in the program must be submitted to the conference management and approved by the Program Chairs before August 1, 2024. Please include your Abstract Control ID or Presentation ID in the subject line of your email.
  • After August 1, 2024, only requests to the presenting author will be considered.
  • Changes to the presenting author can only be requested by the abstract submitter (usually the corresponding author).
  • If you need to withdraw your abstract, please contact Centennial Conferences via e-mail. Please include the reason for withdrawing and provide your Abstract Control ID or Presentation ID in the e-mail subject line.

Manuscript Consideration

  • Authors are invited to submit a manuscript to the special conference issue of the IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity (TAS).
  • Manuscript submission is not a requirement of making a presentation at the conference.
  • Presentation of your work in the published ASC 2024 program is required for a manuscript to be considered for peer review.
    • The presentation should be given at the appointed time in the program, by the appointed presenter.
    • For posters, presentation means that an author is available during the duration of the poster session to discuss the work and answer questions. Posting of the pages of the manuscript does not constitute presentation.
    • Presentation does not guarantee a published manuscript.
  • Changes to the program, which have been approved by the ASC 2024 Program Chairs, will be allowed for submitted manuscripts.
  • Click here for manuscript preparation & submission details.

Recommendations for Presentation Clarity

  • A concise and to-the-point title.
  • Organized to guide the observer through information in a logical order.
  • Provides the motivation, objectives and approach of the research.
  • Summarizes the key results and highlights the impact of the work.
  • Proper use of colors, graphics, figures, text and white space.
  • Moderate use of long text blocks.
  • Proper text scaling for comfortable viewing by a number of people at the same time from a distance of about 3 feet (~ 1 meter).
  • To ensure visual effectiveness of your poster, use large lettering and a minimum of text. Use of color can visually enhance your poster.
  • Efficient use of graphics to convey complex information.

Recommendations for Technical Merit

  • Plan your poster to be in logical sequence, i.e., introduction, study design and methods, data collected, conclusion.
  • The work presented is novel (e.g., novel material, novel device, novel conversion mechanism, novel theoretical approach, novel characterization method, etc.).
  • Systematic analysis conducted to arrive at results.
  • Conclusions supported by the data.

Contact Information

For questions, changes, withdrawal requests, please contact Centennial Conferences via email at asc@centennialconferences.com. Please be sure to reference your Abstract ID in any correspondence.

Awards

Awards Presented at ASC 2024

A number of awards and prizes will be presented to outstanding engineers, scientists, and managers who have made significant contributions to the success of the field of applied superconductivity.

IEEE Awards

 

 

 

The following IEEE Awards will be presented at ASC 2024: 

Nominations are accepted until February 28 of the year in which the award will be presented (unless extension announced). Please visit the IEEE CSC website for full descriptions and nomination procedures of the awards.

Cryogenic Society of America Roger W. Boom Award

 

 

 

 

The Roger W. Boom Award is named in honor of the late emeritus professor from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Boom’s career spanned more than thirty years during which he motivated a great number of young scientists and engineers to pursue careers in cryogenic engineering and applied superconductivity. This award was created by the CSA to be given to a young professional (under 40 years of age) who “shows promise for making significant contributions to the fields of cryogenic engineering and applied superconductivity. The spirit of the Boom Award is to recognize young people for their pursuit of excellence, demonstration of high standards and clear communications.

Nominations Open: April 25, 2024
Nominations Close: August 26, 2024

Please visit the CSA website for more information.

Jan Evetts SuST Award 2024

 

In 2017, the 30th Anniversary of Superconductor Science and Technology (SuST) was marked by the launch of the Jan Evetts Award for the best paper published in SuST by a young researcher. The award is in fond memory of the SuST founding Editor, Professor Jan Evetts. Jan made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials, and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity.

Now in its sixth year, the award aims to continue Jan’s legacy of building a strong and collaborative community in superconductivity, by celebrating burgeoning new minds in the field. The award winners will be announced be at ASC 2024.

  • 1st Prize: Registration for ASC 2024, free Open Access for next paper submitted to SuST, certificate, and a cash prize of £500.
  • 2nd Prize: Registration for ASC 2024, free Open Access for next paper submitted to SuST, and a certificate.
  • 3rd Prize: Free Open Access for next paper submitted to SuST and a certificate.

Entry Criteria
The competition is open to all researchers working in superconductivity (within the scope of SuST) who meet the following criteria:

  • Researchers may only have completed a maximum of 10 years of active research after receiving their PhD.
  • The researcher applying should be the lead author (not necessarily the first author) on the paper.
  • The submission window will be from November 1, 2023 – May 31, 2024.
  • Article type: Only original research papers will be considered.
  • All submissions must include a cover letter that states which author is applying for the award, the year of PhD completion and the individual’s scientific contribution to the research in the submitted paper.

Submission information will be made available at a later date.

Program

Program - Overview

Since 1966, the Applied Superconductivity Conference has been the premier home for applied superconductivity conferences to report, discuss and contemplate important and timely technical advances in science and engineering from the broad fields of electronics, large scale, and materials.

We wish that this 2024 Applied Superconductivity Conference in Salt Lake City continues the tradition by being at the forefront of innovation in Applied Superconductivity! This is why we are excited to launch a new technical category on the use of Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning (AI/ML) as a tool for Applied Superconductivity in Electronics, Large Scale and Materials. The goal is to hear how you are using AI/ML as a tool in your fields so please go ahead and share with the community what you are working on!

Our goal for plenaries is to try to look ahead in each category: with neuromorphic computing on the Electronics front, with the hot topic of fusion as well as status and vision in the high energy physics/accelerators community in Large Scale. Finally, on the Materials front, we will hear about the latest development on IBS and get inspired by a talk about the path forward towards new material development.

We warmly welcome everyone to this 2024 Applied Superconductivity Conference in Salt Lake City for a program of exciting plenary, special session and oral speakers, and engaging posters and workshops.

Electronics

The ASC 2024 conference program on superconductive electronics will focus on devices and technologies that enable high-performance applications, including advanced computing, sensors and detection, quantum-based precision measurements, superconductive electronics-based systems, and quantum engineering. In 2022 we welcomed several new quantum systems topics to our program for a unique opportunity for the Quantum Information community to present their latest results in quantum computing/communication/sensing that involve the use of superconductors in any part of the Quantum System. As in years past, the program will also be home to the Transition-Edge-Sensor (TES) Workshop, which has been an important part of ASC since 2008 (see additional information further below).

Large Scale

The ASC 2024 conference program on large-scale systems will focus on superconducting magnets, superconducting cables, and related technologies for high energy physics, nuclear fusion, high magnetic fields, biological and analytical sciences, medicine, power, energy, transportation, and emerging fields.

Materials

The ASC 2024 conference program on superconducting materials will focus on advances in processing, characterization, properties, industrial fabrication of superconducting thin films, bulks, wires/tapes, cables, high strength and insulation materials, SRF cavity materials for frontier physics, magnets and power applications.

Technical Program Now Available. Click here for details.

Special & Memorial Sessions

The ASC 2024 program committee is planning a number of special sessions which will be of interest for different attendees, including engineers/scientists, system-level developers, and industry-level representatives. Sessions will include special-invited and contributed presentations. Click here for details.

Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) Workshop

Transition-edge sensors, or TESs, are superconducting, thermal detectors. The energy of incoming photons or particles, or the energy of a nuclear reaction within an embedded material, is converted to heat in an absorber. A TES operates in the resistive transition between its superconducting and normal-metal states, where the electrical resistance is a strong function of temperature. Thus, the heat of absorption raises the device temperature and resistance. A SQUID ammeter measures changes in the device current. TESs are increasingly used in many measurement fields, including cosmic microwave background cosmology, X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy, quantum information, dark-matter searches, and measurement of the neutrino mass.

The first TES Workshop was held in 2002, with the goal that TES researchers from across the globe could share, discuss, and understand confusing experimental results from their early TESs of different geometries and materials systems. The TES Workshop has been held every two years since and has been joined to the Applied Superconductivity Conference since 2008. In 2020 the scope of the TES workshop expanded to include other detectors that share some elements of design, physics, or readout with TESs, and are thus of interest to the TES community. These include kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs), magnetic calorimeters, and hot-electron bolometers.

TESs provide interesting laboratories in which to study the nature of superconductivity itself. The TES Workshop has sessions dedicated to device physics, device readout, measurement applications, fabrication, and more. At ASC24, the TES Workshop will include a Special Session highlighting the ongoing work in detectors, readout, and modules of the CMB-S4 project.

To be added to the email list for this and future TES Workshops, please join here. The TES Workshop email list is separate from that of the wider ASC conference. Please follow this link for additional information or reach us by email at tesworkshop2024@gmail.com.

Organized by: Shannon Duff (NIST), Douglas Bennett (NIST), Kaja Rotermund (LBNL), and Paul Szypryt (NIST/CU-Boulder)

Awards

A number of awards and prizes will be presented to outstanding engineers, scientists, and managers who have made significant contributions to the success of the field of applied superconductivity. Click here for Awards details.

Want to be part of this event? Contact us for possibilities!

Technical Program

Technical Program & Agenda

The ASC 2024 Conference Organizers & Program Committee occasionally need to make changes to the program. We urge you to check the schedule before and during the conference for last minute changes.

Special & Memorial Sessions

The ASC 2024 program committee is organizing a series of special sessions which will be of interest to various attendees, including engineers/scientists, system-level developers, and industry-level representatives. These sessions will feature both special invited presentations and contributed talks. In addition, ASC 2024 will be holding memorial sessions to honor remarkable individuals who made significant contributions to the field of applied superconductivity but have since passed away. Click here for details.

Session & Presentation ID Information

The Program ID code shows where in the program your work is scheduled:

The first character of the program ID code indicates the day of the Conference (Monday [1] thru Friday [5]). The next character(s) (E, L, M, J-ML, PL) denotes the conference area (Electronics, Large Scale, Materials, Joint-Materials & Large Scale, Plenary). Or or Po refer to an Oral or Poster session respectively. 1, 2 or 3 represent the time slots of the session. A, B, C, etc., differentiate the parallel sessions in a given session time slot. The final digit (01, 02, 03, etc.) denotes the presentation order within the session.

Examples of Session and Presentation ID’s for a morning, afternoon and late afternoon oral sessions are 1EOr1A01, 1EOr2A01, and 1EOr3A01. Examples for the morning and afternoon poster sessions are 2LPo1A01 and 2LPo2A01.

Click on the image below to open the Schedule at a Glance in PDF format.

 

 

 

Authors

Authors

General Information

  • All authors identified as speaker/presenting author on the accepted abstract must register for the conference and be present in Salt Lake City.
  • Presentations are either oral or poster. The Program Committee reserves the right to change the type of presentation from that preferred by the author to accommodate limitations on meeting space and other constraints.
  • Presentation is a requirement for a submitted manuscript to be considered for peer review. This includes presentations in oral or poster format. The presentation should be given at the appointed time in the program, by the designated author or co-author (presenter). Only manuscripts based on material presented in an oral presentation or on a poster will be considered for publication. For posters, the word “presented” means that the presenting author must be present during the entire session and available for discussion. Simply posting an enlarged version of the manuscript is not considered as a presentation. The abstract submitter will become the contact author for the manuscript submission. Manuscript submission is not required.
  • Abstract submission deadline: 11 59 PM EST, January 17, 2024.  Abstract submissions are no longer accepted except for the extreme circumstance of presenting last minute, ground-breaking research. In such cases, please contact Centennial Conferences by email with your abstract be sure to include the appropriate submission category. Abstracts will be sent to the Program Committee Chairs for possible consideration at the committee’s discretion.
  • After the abstract submission deadline, abstracts will no longer be accepted except for the extreme circumstance of presenting last minute, ground-breaking research.
  • Oral and Poster presentation guidelines are now available.
  • Abstract acceptance notifications will be emailed to the submitting and presenting authors on March 4, 2024.
  • Manuscript preparation and submission information can be found here.

 

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